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101 Best Board Games showcases classic family and popular board games.


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During the 15th and 16th centuries, the great royal houses of Europe sent explorers and conquerors all over the world, hoping to discover and secure new areas of influence and sources of wealth. Without the right naval vessels, these voyages would…

Age of Discovery

Link to Age of Discovery

Tags:
[cards]
Categories:
[Family]
[Travel]
Topics:
[Economics]

Rating: 4.67/5 (3 votes)

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  • Australia

    Rating: 4.33/5 (3 votes)

    Australia – the fifth and smallest continent - at the beginning of the 1920s. The economic crisis is yet to come – Australia is booming. Industrial modernisation and development are pursued with vigour to help the economy “down under” progress.…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Strategy]
  • Carcassonne

    Rating: 4.29/5 (17 votes)

    A clever tile-laying game. The southern French city of Carcassonne is famous for its unique Roman and Medieval fortifications. The players develop the area around Carcassonne and deploy their followers on the roads, in the cities, in the cloisters…

    Cats:
    [Family]
  • The Settlers of Catan

    Rating: 4.18/5 (17 votes)

    Players are recent immigrants to the newly populated island of Catan. Expand your colony through the building of settlements, roads, and villages by harvesting commodities from the land around you. Trade sheep, lumber, bricks and grain for a settlement,…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Strategy]
  • You've been Sentenced!

    Rating: 4.17/5 (6 votes)

    You’ve been Sentenced! uses pentagon-shaped cards with conjugations of funny words, famous names, and familiar places. Each player uses his or her hand of 10 cards to build a grammatically correct sentence, racing the other players while…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Childrens]
  • Stone Age

    Rating: 4.00/5 (15 votes)

    Each age has its special challenges. The stone age was shaped by the emergence of agriculture, the processing of useful resources, and by the building of simple huts. Trade begins and grows and civilization takes root and spreads. In addition, traditional…

    Cats:
    [Strategy]
    [Family]
  • Ticket to Ride

    Rating: 4.00/5 (14 votes)

    Ticket to Ride is a cross-country train adventure in which players collect and play matching train cards to claim railway routes connecting cities throughout North America. The longer the routes, the more points they…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Travel]
  • Dragonriders

    Rating: 4.00/5 (3 votes)

    Climb aboard your trusty steed and lift off for the race of your life! The players race their dragons on a course in a deep and winding canyon. You have some magic to use to aid your cause, or hinder your opponents, but the real test is your skill…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Fantasy]
  • Twisted Fish

    Rating: 3.90/5 (10 votes)

    Twisted Fish takes the old favorite “Go Fish” and casts it into the 21st century. The game offers guaranteed laugh-out-loud fun for the entire family and features outrageously humorous fishy characters, as well as tantalizingly unpredictable Zinger…

    Cats:
    [Strategy]
    [Family]
    [Childrens]
  • #10 Rollick!

    Rollick!

    Rating: 3.78/5 (18 votes)

    The Hysterical Game of Clues and Collaboration. Rollick! is a new hit party game that’s a fast and furious team competition. With Rollick!, the entire team works together to act out clue words for one person to guess. It’s a hysterical,…

    Cats:
    [Family]
  • Survival Camp

    Rating: 3.75/5 (4 votes)

    Survival Camp is a dice and card game based on survival of the fittest. A zombie outbreak has occurred in your town and you must grab what you can and run. You’ll never be able to come back. It’s time to build your survival camp.  …

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Fantasy]
    [Strategy]
    [Travel]
  • Aqua Romana

    Rating: 3.75/5 (4 votes)

    It is Rome and they do not have enough drinking water. Master builders oversee their workers as they build the necessary aquaducts to bring the people the water they need. The winner will be they player who best manages his workers to build the longest…

    Cats:
    [Family]
  • China Rails

    Rating: 3.67/5 (3 votes)

    For centuries, trade has been a crucial factor of life in China. From the ancient "Silk Road" to modern ocean trade, the flow of goods and cargo was the very lifeblood of the great "Middle Kingdom." Once, bearers traveling on foot or carts pulled…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Strategy]
  • Puerto Rico

    Rating: 3.60/5 (5 votes)

    Prospector, captain, mayor, trader, settler, craftsman, or builder?Which roles will you play in the new world? Will you own the most prosperous plantations? Will you build the most valuable buildings? You have but one goal: achieve the greatest prosperity…

    Cats:
    [Family]
    [Strategy]
  • Family Business

    Rating: 3.50/5 (2 votes)

    Be the boss in this fast-paced card game of survival on the mean streets. "Family Business" pits mobsters against each other - all working to make sure theirs is the last family standing! Your gang members get placed on the Hit List.…

    Cats:
    [Family]
  • #16 Atlantis

    Atlantis

    Rating: 3.40/5 (5 votes)

    You control a faction in beautiful Atlantis, the glorious civilization built upon the sea. No other city rivals its power. None command such riches. Now, the link between the land and your beloved home of Atlantis is crumbling! You must race to move…

    Cats:
    [Family]

Other stuff

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  • Review: Millennium Blades

    Thrower: The table is a wreck of cards, tokens and wads of cash. One player has collapsed on the sofa, eyes closed, exhausted. Another feverishly sorts their deck, cards held close to face, unable to understand what went wrong. Someone else has walked out, professing a desire for space and calm.

    I’m wondering where the last two hours went and how I didn’t notice we now have an audience of a new visitor and a cat. I realise, suddenly, that on this cool spring evening I’m bathed in sweat. This is the aftermath of Millennium Blades.

    We’ve spent the time pretending to be players of a fictional collectible card game in an anime universe. Millennium Blades is, then, a game about playing games. This sounds like a recipe for a design that disappears up its own backside. Instead, this game is interesting, intense and ingenious. Stuffed with self-referential satire, it sits, winking at its players from the comfort of its oversize box. If you can unpick all the parodies from a card called “I’ll Form the Head” from the “Obari as Hell” card set, you’re a higher voltage gamer than me.

  • RPG Review: Trail of Cthulhu

    Cynthia: It is a little known fact I accompanied Paul Dean during his fearless investigations into the horrific Mythos Tales affair earlier this spring. I witnessed some of those same horrors, unearthed dark revelations couched in official documents, grappled with non-euclidean maps, and ventured alongside him into spaces where our accustomed rules of time and space seemed to break down.

    None of that prepared me for the bizarre investigations that I commenced upon my return to Minneapolis –– investigations that continue as I write. Therefore, while I still retain enough of my mind to write, I find it imperative to tell you all this:

    There is no Lovecraftian mystery game as engrosssing, as well-crafted, or as much sheer fun as Pelgrane’s roleplaying game, Trail of Cthulhu.

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    Paul: Gawd, I love BGG. It’s one of my favourite gaming places on the internet and this has been a fascinating journey.

    Quinns: It’s an astonishingly rigorous database. As if IMDB was combined with a… an educated mosh pit, but with a set of scales in the corner that told you how much every actor weighed.

    As we close out this feature, I’m simply left wanting to play more board games. Which is surely the best possible result.

  • SU&SD Take on The Board Game Geek Top 100: 20-11

    Quinns: Matt, we have to abort this feature! Reddit’s disapproval is reaching critical levels.

    Matt: That’s not the Reddit alarm, that’s my egg timer. I’m making everybody lunchtime eggs to keep up our strength.

    Quinns: Wow! I could kiss you.

    Matt: Don’t kiss on me, daddy-oats, kiss on these great games.

  • SU&SD Take on The Board Game Geek Top 100: 40-21

    Paul: Matt it’s nearly Friday, how are we only now poking our way into the top 40? Why did we take on this challenge?

    Matt: Trains.

    Quinns: He’s a goner, Paul. There’s nothing we can do for him now. PRESS FORWARD.

  • SU&SD Take on The Board Game Geek Top 100: 60-41

    Quinns: As we continue our marathon-like jog through Board Game Geek’s top 100 games ever, today I can reveal that we’re out of the weeds. We’ve played every single board game in the 60-41 slot!

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  • SU&SD Take on The Board Game Geek Top 100: 80-61

    Paul: Our exhaustive look at the games jostling their way about BoardGameGeek’s Top 100 continues! Today, we have everything from international illness to urban development to mischievous academics. Oh, and opinions. Always with the sassy opinions. ONWARD.

    Star Realms

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    A mobile game makes an infectiously good transition to tabletop, a card game richly rewards smart selection and a domino-strategy mashup is a quickfire winner

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    In 2007, a simple web game, Pandemic, challenged players with spreading an infection across the world. Around the same time, an unrelated board game of the same name tasked its players with preventing the spread of disease and quickly assumed cult status. Soon after, a mobile game called Plague Inc reversed the goal again, making global epidemic a mainstay of many commutes, while happily crediting the original Pandemic web game as an inspiration. Now Plague Inc has been reimagined as a board game that looks much like a homage to the board game, completing a considerable circle over 10 years.

    Continue reading…

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